The Hermitage Museum
The Hermitage Museum
     
Project Details

Name of Project: 
 
The Hermitage Museum
Location: 
 
Amsterdam
Lighting Design:
 
Hans Wolff Lighting Design
     
Fittings Used on Project

Raylight 3D

     
Press Release

Light Projects has worked closely with lighting designer Hans Wolff on the stunning new €35 million 9,000 square metre Hermitage Museum in Amsterdam. The Hermitage Amsterdam is the first branch of the magnificent Russian State Museum Hermitage in St. Petersburg and is housed in the elegantly restored and enlarged 17th Century Amstelhof house. The opening exhibition is named ‘At the Russian Court’ and tells the story about the court life of the Russian Tsars. This will be followed by two large large-scale, temporary exhibitions each year drawn from various Russian Museums.

Light Projects supplied over 1,700 bespoke and specially manufactured fittings for the two main galleries as well as all other exhibition areas. In all, three new variants were created from the following products in the Raylight family;The Ray Bos, Raylight 3D and Raylight Cove - all of which utilise Tungsten Halogen lamps. These were used along with the popular Ray Zar 3 CDM-R III. Each newly-designed fitting was created to answer a specific need for this complex and beautiful lighting scheme.

The Ray Bos variant features a new transformer housing with rounded end supplied complete with an integral self dimming facility and the Raylight 3D variant features a specially extended extruded body to facilitate focusing beneath the wooden beams of the building. All the fittings also had a new integral baffle to fully encompass the lamp for improved aesthetics.


A new asymmetrical wall wash accessory was created to kick light down the walls in a uniformed fashion. Other accessories used within this scheme include eggcrete louvres, ultraviolet glass, spreader lenses, frost filters and various scrims. 

This complex and demanding application once again illustrates how the Raylight series for the most demanding of individual tasks while keeping a subtle and uniform feel across the whole lighting scheme whole.